Sex and Psychology Podcast

Step into the sex lab

The Sex and Psychology Podcast, hosted by Kinsey Institute Research Fellow Dr. Justin Lehmiller, is here to help you understand the most important sex organ in the entire body: your brain. Each episode offers a deep dive into the psychology of sex and relationships, drawing upon expert interviews and Dr. Lehmiller’s extensive body of research. The Sex and Psychology Podcast is the sex ed you never got in school–and won’t find anywhere else. Catch up with the latest episodes below, and subscribe on your favorite podcast platform to keep up to date.

“11 sex podcasts that will help you get better in bed.”
“11 sex podcasts that will help you get better in bed.”
“10 best sex podcasts to listen to right now”
“10 best sex podcasts to listen to right now”
“Top 10 sexuality podcasts”
“Top 10 sexuality podcasts”

Listen & Subscribe

Latest Episodes

November 26, 2021

Episode 62: The Myth of the “Hormonal Woman”

Evolutionary psychologists have long argued that women’s sexual behavior is driven by hormonal changes that occur throughout the menstrual cycle, including everything from their desire for sex to their partner choice. This has fed the popular idea that hormones are really the driving force behind women’s sexuality. As it turns out, however, that’s not entirely true. In this episode, we’re going to be deconstructing the myth of the “hormonal woman” with Dr. Tierney Lorenz, a former Kinsey Institute trainee who is currently an assistant professor in the Department of Psychology at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln. Tierney studies the interaction between women’s mental, physical, and sexual health. Some of the topics we explore in this episode include:
  • What role do hormones and the menstrual cycle really play when it comes to women’s sexual behavior?
  • Scientists have long argued that ovulation triggers changes in sexual behavior, but it turns out that having sex can actually trigger ovulation. So what does this mean for couples who are trying to get pregnant?
  • How does having sex impact how the immune system operates?
  • What is the key to boosting sexual desire? Can testosterone supplements help? What about medications?
  • How do sexual health, physical health, and mental health all intersect?
  • How can people with a history of sexual trauma go on to develop happier, healthier sex lives?
This interview blew my mind in several ways, so be sure to check it out! To learn more about Tierney, follow her on Twitter @tk_lorenz and follow her lab at @lab_wish This podcast was made on Zencastr. Join Zencastr today and receive 40% off of their professional plan for 3 months with my exclusive discount code: sexandpsych *** Want to learn more about Sex and Psychology? Click here for previous articles or follow the blog on FacebookTwitter, or Reddit to receive updates. You can also follow Dr. Lehmiller on YouTube and Instagram. Listen and stream all episodes on AppleSpotifyGoogle, or Amazon. Subscribe to automatically receive new episodes and please rate and review the podcast!

Credits: LEGIT Audio (Podcast editing) and Shutterstock/Florian (Music). Image created with Canva; photos used with permission of guest.

November 19, 2021

Episode 61: “No Nut November” and the Science of Masturbation

Each November, media buzz around the annual abstinence challenge known as “No Nut November” seems to grow. This challenge involves men giving up ejaculation for the entire month. That means no sex and no masturbation—no orgasms of any kind. Those who participate do this for a wide range of reasons, but often with the intention of enhancing their health. But are there actually any health benefits to abstaining from orgasm for prolonged periods of time? To dive into what the science says, I spoke with Dr. Joshua Gonzalez, a board-certified urologist who is fellowship-trained in Sexual Medicine. We give a research-based take on “No Nut November,” while also offering a crash course in “semenology” to answer common questions about ejaculation and orgasm. Some of the topics we explore in this episode include:
  • Where does semen come from and what is it made of?
  • How many calories are in a single “serving” of semen? Is it really a source of protein?
  • Why are so many men concerned about their ejaculatory volume? And is there anything they can do to increase it?
  • Can abstinence from sex and masturbation enhance athletic performance?
  • What is the link between masturbation and health? In what ways can being sexually active (both solo and partnered) potentially boost health?
  • What are the most common sexual difficulties men experience, and what can they do to reduce their odds of developing them?
  • What do men need to know about having better sex?
To learn more about Joshua, visit his website at joshuagonzalezmd.com. You can also check out his supplement Popstar at popstarlabs.com and follow him on social media: This podcast was made on Zencastr. Join Zencastr today and receive 40% off of their professional plan for 3 months with my exclusive discount code: sexandpsych *** Want to learn more about Sex and Psychology? Click here for previous articles or follow the blog on FacebookTwitter, or Reddit to receive updates. You can also follow Dr. Lehmiller on YouTube and Instagram. Listen and stream all episodes on AppleSpotifyGoogle, or Amazon. Subscribe to automatically receive new episodes and please rate and review the podcast!

Credits: LEGIT Audio (Podcast editing) and Shutterstock/Florian (Music). Image created with Canva; photos used with permission of guest.

November 12, 2021

Episode 60: The Science of Orgasms

What does it really mean to have an orgasm? Different people—and even different scientists—define “orgasm” in different ways, which makes this a surprisingly difficult subject to study scientifically. So how do you measure when someone has an orgasm in a research lab? For this episode, I spoke to an orgasm researcher who has figured out how to do it. Her methods and findings are absolutely fascinating and will change everything you think you know about orgasms! My guest today is Dr. Nicole Prause, a licensed psychologist and sex researcher who founded the sexual biotechnology company Liberos. She is a former Kinsey Institute trainee and has published an extensive body of research on the neuroscience and psychophysiology of sex. Some of the topics we explore in this episode include:
  • What technology do you need to study orgasms scientifically?
  • Orgasms have both a physiological and a psychological component—but they don’t always line up in the same way for everyone. So what does it mean when someone experiences one but not the other?
  • What does it actually mean to have multiple orgasms? Are we talking back-to-back orgasms with continued sexual stimulation? Can you take breaks? How much time can pass between each orgasm for it to count as “multiple?”
  • Is there really a gender difference in the ability to have multiple orgasms? (The answer may surprise you!)
  • Some people get sick every time they orgasm. What causes this post-orgasmic illness syndrome?
  • Are there really different “types” of orgasms, or are all orgasms technically the same process?
  • What happens inside the brain during an orgasm?
  • For people who have trouble orgasming, what can they do about it?
This podcast was made on Zencastr. Join Zencastr today and receive 40% off of their professional plan for 3 months with my exclusive discount code: sexandpsych *** Want to learn more about Sex and Psychology? Click here for previous articles or follow the blog on FacebookTwitter, or Reddit to receive updates. You can also follow Dr. Lehmiller on YouTube and Instagram. Listen and stream all episodes on AppleSpotifyGoogle, or Amazon. Subscribe to automatically receive new episodes and please rate and review the podcast!

Credits: LEGIT Audio (Podcast editing) and Shutterstock/Florian (Music). Image created with Canva; photos used with permission of guest.

November 5, 2021

Episode 59: Can You “Cheat-Proof” Your Relationship?

Most people say that their ideal relationship would be monogamous. Despite this, however, a lot of people seem to have a really hard time maintaining monogamy. So why is that? And if monogamy is what you want, how can you most successfully maintain it and reduce the risk of infidelity? For the answers to these questions, I spoke with Dr. Lucia O’Sullivan, a Professor of Psychology at the University of New Brunswick. She has published over 100 peer-reviewed articles on sexual and romantic relationships and is an Associate Editor of the Journal of Sex Research. Some of the topics we discuss in this episode include:
  • What does it mean to be “monogamous?” Do different people define monogamy in different ways?
  • Why is it a bad idea to assume monogamy in a relationship?
  • What works and what doesn’t when it comes to maintaining monogamy? Is there anything you can do to “cheat-proof” your relationship?
  • What happens when someone in a monogamous relationship develops a crush on someone else? When is this harmless, and when does it become a threat to the relationship?
  • Are some people better equipped to maintain monogamy than others?
  • What happens when someone “poaches” a partner from another relationship? How do those relationships tend to work out?
  • What does sex education look like around the world?
To learn more about Lucia, check out her Psychology Today blog “At First Blush” and her website SexMeetsRelationships.com This podcast was made on Zencastr. Join Zencastr today and receive 40% off of their professional plan for 3 months with my exclusive discount code: sexandpsych *** Want to learn more about Sex and Psychology? Click here for previous articles or follow the blog on FacebookTwitter, or Reddit to receive updates. You can also follow Dr. Lehmiller on YouTube and Instagram. Listen and stream all episodes on AppleSpotifyGoogle, or Amazon. Subscribe to automatically receive new episodes and please rate and review the podcast!

Credits: LEGIT Audio (Podcast editing) and Shutterstock/Florian (Music). Image created with Canva; photos used with permission of guest.

October 29, 2021

Episode 58: The Sex Lives of College Students

What do the sex lives of college students today look like? And how have they changed over time? I spoke with a sex educator who has amassed more than 30 years’ worth of data from students taking her university human sexuality courses. In total, she surveyed nearly 7,000 students and has obtained unique insights into how everything from kink to faking orgasms to condom use has changed since the 1990s. My guest today is Dr. Sandra Caron, a Professor of Family Relations and Human Sexuality at the University of Maine. She is an AASECT Certified Sexuality Educator and a licensed therapist. Her latest book is titled The Sex Lives of College Students. Some of the topics we explore in this episode include:
  • Has the rise of abstinence-only sex education affected the age at which young people start having sex?
  • What is the average number of sexual partners a college student has?
  • Why are fake orgasms on the rise among both college men and women alike?
  • Are college students masturbating more today than they were in the past?
  • Have college students gotten kinkier over time?
  • How have same-sex behavior and sexual identity changed among young people?
  • Are college students today taking more sexual risks or are they practicing safer sex?
This podcast was made on Zencastr. Join Zencastr today and receive 40% off of their professional plan for 3 months with my exclusive discount code: sexandpsych *** Want to learn more about Sex and Psychology? Click here for previous articles or follow the blog on FacebookTwitter, or Reddit to receive updates. You can also follow Dr. Lehmiller on YouTube and Instagram. Listen and stream all episodes on AppleSpotifyGoogle, or Amazon. Subscribe to automatically receive new episodes and please rate and review the podcast! Credits: LEGIT Audio (Podcast editing) and Shutterstock/Florian (Music). Image created with Canva; photos used with permission of guest.

Let's Collab

Want to be a guest on the Sex and Psychology Podcast, sponsor a podcast, or do you have a question or topic you want to see addressed on the podcast? Send Justin an email to start the conversation.

Email Justin